Dr. Wendy Rice, Author at Rice Psychology

“Perfection” on Social Media Does Not Make You Perfect

Consider the following story as it relates to this week’s topic. I love following bloggers on Instagram and could spend hours watching their makeup or home DIY tutorials. In fact, I love it so much that it’s starting to interfere with my lifestyle in a significant way. Ever since I discovered the world of bloggers on Instagram, Facebook, and Pinterest who share their beauty recommendations, cooking tips, or home decor projects, I’ve become somewhat obsessed - and not in a good way. I’ve become overwhelmed with perfection and making sure that my life looks just as good as theirs on social media....

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How Good Eating Habits Can Benefit People of All Ages on a Mental Level

Consider the following story as it relates to this week’s topic. For the longest time, I tried to lose weight but kept falling back to my old habits. I’d lose a few pounds here and there, but it was never a noticeable change. It left my already negative perception of myself in shambles. A friend suggested that I make some small changes to my eating habits before getting into exercising so I didn’t bite off more than I could chew in the too-many-changes-at-once department. It was tough at first, but I began eating healthier and cutting out sugars and trans fats....

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A Good Year: What You Can do to Successfully Stick to Your New Year’s Resolution!

Consider the following story as it relates to this week’s topic. That’s it! I’m done putting all of my faith into a New Year’s resolution. I think I’ll just come to terms with the fact that my resolutions will never come to fruition. Five years ago, I told myself I’d lose 50 pounds by summer 2015. Then I swore I’d do a better job of saving money in 2016. In 2017, I promised myself that I’d reconnect with old friends and keep those friendships strong. Then I resolved to keep my social media use at a minimum in 2018. Finally, I...

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Exposure Therapy: How Dealing with Your Anxiety Through Discussion AND Action Can Work

I recently asked a middle schooler what the word “anxiety” meant to her. I’m sharing this with her permission and that of her mother’s. Her response was: Being in crowds of people, sharing things with the class, sometimes just going to school, doing anything that’s awkward in front of people who I know or may see again. Anxiety feels like being nervous, scared, sometimes frozen in place, or like, “I’ve got to get out of here!” I’ve learned that taking small steps toward doing things that scare me has helped me get braver. I think that doing stuff is more helpful...

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Depression: Know That There is a Way Out

In the spirit of leading Rice Psychology Group from an authentic place and not shying away from vulnerability and imperfection (thank you for giving words to this, Brené Brown), I’d like to share a few short snippets from the journals I kept in high school. Fortunately, I’ve come a long way since then! I do worry about what you might think when reading this, but I hope it provides some evidence that I really do understand suffering. Please be warned that some of these entries contain obscenities and may be difficult to read. June – 10th grade: “The pressure is so overwhelming....

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A Millennial Approach: Helping Young Clients Remember Their Therapy Sessions

Consider the following story as it relates to this week’s topic. I have a ton of things on my mind each day. Even when I’m in bed, my head is spinning with reminders, ideas, and random thoughts! I’ve gotten so busy that I’m starting to forget what my weekly therapy appointments were about, especially those focused on the previous week. When my therapist and I chat, I tend to have trouble focusing since my responsibilities or something interesting I saw online always pops back into my head and I’m constantly wanting my phone to either help me take care of them...

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No One Chooses to Experience Depression and Anxiety

Consider the following story as it relates to this week’s topic. About three months ago, I was diagnosed with depression after moving to a new city to start a career. It’s been rough not having family and friends in this different environment. A few days ago, I spoke about it with some of my coworkers and one of them responded with, “Oh, it can’t be that bad. Just try to be happy!” Hearing that upset me because my depression isn’t controlled with an On/Off switch. I try my best to put on a happy face, but sometimes it’s just impossible. I...

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Thanksgiving Stress: What You Can do to Avoid Tension with Your Family

Consider the following story as it relates to this week’s topic. Thanksgiving is one of the holidays I most dread. Every year it’s the same thing with my family.   “So, when are you going to have another child?” or “You’re 30 and still at that entry-level job. I thought you were going to go to law school.” I love my family, but I always find myself getting annoyed or angry by their nosiness. Every holiday, it feels like the feast ends in an argument, whether it’s over relationships, money, or everyone’s favorite topic: politics. Is there anything my family and I...

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Parental Awareness: Discussing Mental Health, Its Effects, and Understanding it with Your Child

Consider the following story as it relates to this week’s topic. My son, Matthew, came to me today and said that a classmate of his had been pulled from school after being diagnosed with what I later found out was a severe episode of depression. My wife and I sat down with him to explain what the disorder was. Matt is only nine but has a good head on his shoulders. He listened to what we had to say and asked some pretty good questions. I never really imagined that we’d have to talk to him about mental health at such...

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Anxiety and Depression with Teens and Helping Them Become Resilient

Consider the following story as it relates to this week’s topic. This is my son’s first year of high school and I’m noticing some changes in his behavior. He appears sullen and distracted much more often than he did last year and is spending an unfathomable amount of time on social media. His first report card arrived last week, and his grades were mostly B’s and C’s, which surprised me since he’s always been an A student. I tried talking to him about it, but he’s been very standoffish and brushes my concerns away. Is there something my husband and I...

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