ADHD Archives | Rice Psychology

Your Child’s ADHD: What it Takes to Adapt as a Parent

Consider the following story as it relates to this week’s topic. My husband and I recently found out that our 11-year old son, Ryan, has ADHD. It started with a call from his teacher saying that he wasn’t focusing enough in class despite having good grades on tests. We then had a meeting with the school psychologist who said Ryan was showing some behaviors that were similar to other children with ADHD, which was confirmed with a private child psychologist later on. It’s tough at times for sure, but with our son’s psychologist helping us out, it’s starting to get easier....

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The Internet, Adult ADHD, and the Best Ways to Stay Focused

Consider the following story as it relates to this week’s topic. I’m a registered nurse and, recently, I was assigned to a more administrative position that requires a lot of desk work. Before, I was always on my feet, going back and forth between patients and following a schedule that helped me take care of my responsibilities. Now, I’m in front of a computer most of my shift. As an adult with ADHD, this makes me nervous since I am easily distracted by the many things going on around me. With new duties that don’t really require following a typical...

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ADHD in Girls and Women: How it Differs from What We Typically See in Boys and Men

Consider the following story as it relates to this week’s topic. I just got off the phone with Maggie’s teacher an hour ago. It’s the third time she’s called me this month and it’s always for the same reason. Apparently, Maggie is extremely chatty. Like, too chatty. I kind of figured it was normal for girls to be chatty. After all, she’s been this way since she learned to speak and became more talkative when she started elementary school. I’m starting to wonder if this is in some way related to her ADHD. I always assumed kids with ADHD were...

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A Daily Routine: Helping to Keep Your ADHD at Bay

Consider the following story as it relates to this week’s piece. My wandering mind is no secret to any of my friends or family, and it can often keep me from completing even the smallest of things. However, my family told me that they started seeing a difference in me once I began to implement a routine for my days. You see, my ADHD can make things difficult, but by using a few strategies that I’ve learned from my therapist, I’ve been able to improve and keep things under control. It’s hard work, but now that my son has been diagnosed...

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Dyslexia: What it is and How it Can be Treated

Consider the following story as it relates to this week’s piece. Today I received some worrying news. My 10-year old son, Christopher, was diagnosed with dyslexia. My husband and I were aware that there was an issue when his teacher brought to our attention that he was having some trouble in class. I’ll admit that we’re both terrified. Will he trail behind his schoolmates? Is he going to be held back a grade? Will he even be accepted into a college after high school? I know I’m getting ahead of myself, and Chris’s psychologist explained to us that he can still...

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An Issue in Later Life: How You Can Deal with ADHD as an Adult

When I was diagnosed with ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) as a kid, I didn’t know what to expect. All I remember was feeling terrified. I felt like as though something was seriously wrong with me that would make my life difficult to deal with. Luckily for me, it was easier to manage than I expected once I learned about ADHD and followed through on some of the tips my psychologist gave me. Now that I’m an adult, doing a few seemingly small things here and there like keeping distractions out of my way at work or making lists of...

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An In-Depth Look at the Symptoms of ADHD

Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is often diagnosed during childhood and usually characterized by difficulties regulating attention, controlling impulsivity and hyperactivity. About 10% of children and 4% of adults can be affected by the symptoms of ADHD. Unfortunately, the symptoms of this neurodevelopmental (brain-based) disorder can often be mistaken for “acting out,” temper tantrums, poor parenting and laziness. This can potentially lead to lack of help and additional developmental troubles. Rice Psychology Group is devoted to understanding what’s going on beneath the surface with children and adults and wants you to be able to recognize the symptoms of ADHD as easily and early...

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5 Common ADD/ADHD Myths

As a parent, you may know children who can’t seem to remain still, rarely listen, never follow instructions and make inappropriate comments at the wrong time. It’s possible that your own child has been showing this type of behavior. Some may label these kids as troublemakers, while others will suspect they show signs of ADD/ADHD. However, one of the best things you can do is read the signs and keep some common myths about ADD/ADHD in mind. The Rice Psychology Group is devoted to your child and wants to keep you well-informed. Your child’s needs matter. Request an appointment with Rice Psychology...

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Study Finds Kids with ADHD May Benefit from Movement

About 19% of high school boys and 11% of school-aged children have been diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in the United States. In classroom settings, these children and adolescents are regularly encouraged to be still and quiet. However, a study published in the Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology recently found that moving around may be an effective way to help children with ADHD learn. Request an appointment with Rice Psychology Group to help tend to your child’s needs. Educated Findings According to the study, led by Dr. Mark Rapport, psychologist at the University of Central Florida, physical activity is significant in...

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Problematic Behavior in Children Linked to Soda Consumption?

In a very timely study released in the Journal of Pediatrics this month, researchers from Columbia University, the University of Vermont and Harvard studied behavior in approximately 3,000 young children and found that problematic behavior was linked to soda consumption.  They used a very well accepted child behavior rating scale, one that I have personally used in my practice for over ten years, to obtain parents perspectives on their children’s behavior over the past two months. They found that 40% of kids had at least one soda per day and 4% drank as many as four or more. They found that aggression, withdrawn behavior and attention problems were highly associated with soda drinking and the behaviors were incrementally worse...

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