Parenting Archives | Page 6 of 11 | Rice Psychology
Rice Psychology Group is looking to hire a Licensed Doctoral Level Child/Adolescent Psychologist.
If you are a psychologist who loves working with children and families and would like to learn more about this position or apply, click here.

Why “Yes” Works: Taking a Break from Being a Constant “No” Parent

Consider the following as they relate to this week’s topic. 16-year old boy: I have to argue with my mom because, no matter what I ask her, her first answer is always no. And if I calmly accept that, she’ll never let me do anything because she’ll think that saying no to me is okay. So, I argue even if I know that what I want is something she’d never let me do. That way, when I ask for more reasonable things, maybe she’ll say yes! Driving home from soccer practice at 8:00 PM on a week night:  Take 1:  12-year old girl: Mom, could...

Read More

Seeking Too Much: Why Constantly Reassuring Your Children Isn’t Always Good

Consider the following story as it relates to this week’s topic. I’ve noticed over the past year or so that Chelsea has been asking me more and more of the same types of questions. These can range from, “Will you definitely be picking me up from soccer practice after school?”, to “Are you sure that the vegetables in the salad aren’t spoiled?” I usually answer these with a simple and reassuring “yes” to quell her concerns, but it’s getting to the point that she’s needing reassurance for almost everything and is sometimes asking me the same thing but in different ways....

Read More

Social Tips: Helping Your Child Connect

I was at my mother’s yesterday and was telling her about how Brian can be pretty awkward when he’s with other kids. It’s not that he doesn’t like spending time with his classmates; it’s just that his social cues seem to be…off. I told her that two of his friends told him what appeared to be a secret, and he replied by repeating what he’d just heard loud enough for everyone to hear. While I laughed as I witnessed it, I realized that this might be a sign that his social skills are not exactly honed. I want Brian to...

Read More

A Smartphone Holiday: What You Should Keep in Mind Before Making a Purchase for Your Child

Written by Matthew Rigberg, LHMC Consider the following story as it relates to this week’s piece. Susan is the mother of a 12-year old boy and 14-year old girl. She finds herself in a difficult spot. Both of her children have given her a list of gifts that they’d like, and a smartphone is at the top of each. Susan understands the utility of a smartphone; it allows her and her children to remain in contact throughout the day, it’s great for emergencies and will allow her kids to communicate and interact with their friends. She and her husband have worked hard...

Read More

Kids and Smartphones: When is the Perfect Time for Them to Own One?

Last night, I participated in another showing of Screenagers. This time, it was presented at Hillel Academy in Tampa with co-sponsorship by Tampa Day School and Keystone Prep High School with over 100 people in attendance. I led the discussion following the movie and one of the questions that was asked was, “At what age is right or best to give your child a smartphone?” Deciding When the Time is Right Not having an exact age to offer and being well aware of the challenges smartphones come with, my answer was that there would need to be extenuating circumstances to warrant giving...

Read More

Fear with Kids: What’s Normal and What’s Not?

Consider the following story as it relates to this week’s piece. I’m a bit nervous for this year’s Halloween. I have three kids and my two oldest are more than excited, but my youngest is the one I’m worried about. Last Halloween was Nick’s first outing to a haunted house and trick-or-treating. He was only six years old, so I should’ve known better. I didn’t prepare him at all for the haunted house and he ran out screaming and crying a minute after entering. I felt so horrible seeing him terrified like that. For a few days, he was constantly remembering...

Read More

Pregnancy: Getting Through One of the Most Difficult Periods of Your Life

Written by Amanda Schwait Ph.D., Licensed Psychologist There are few phrases in life that change your world quite like the words, “You’re pregnant.” No matter the circumstances surrounding your pregnancy, you can be sure that there are definitely going to be changes in your body, mind, lifestyle and/or family structure. Before getting to the part where you’ll raise a child, you’ll have to make it through the pregnancy. Life is full of challenges. Sometimes, we easily rise to the occasion, but there are also times where we need help understanding what's going on and how to cope. With the help of our...

Read More

That Time of Year Again: Helping Your Kids Gear Up for a New School Year

*Author’s Note: Many of our readers live in Florida where school starts during the second week of August. We know that the northerners still have another month of summer to go. Consider the following story as it relates to this week’s piece. A week into the new school year and I can already tell it’s going to be a tough one. Angela is still struggling to wake up early and having difficulty with homework. To top things off, my husband and I received a call from her teacher this morning telling us that Angela can barely keep her eyes open during class!...

Read More

Living the College Life: Is Your Child Ready to Take on This New Lifestyle?

*Consider the following story as it relates to this week’s piece. After many years of driving him to school, supporting him at soccer practice and attending every teacher-parent meeting possible, my son is finally heading off to college. The truth is that I couldn’t be happier for him, but my neighbor planted a bit of worry in my mind last night. She was talking about the college experience, how students have to be independent and how parents have to step back and let them live their own lives. I know I’ve always babied him, but now I’m not sure if he’s...

Read More

The Introverted Child: Understanding This Behavior and Teaching Your Kids That it’s Perfectly Fine

By Elaine Spencer, Psy.D. Licensed Psychologist “She’s finally starting to come out of her shell.” “It just takes him a little longer to warm up to others.” “She’s more of a listener than a talker.” “He likes to take in what’s going on before joining others.” “She prefers to hang out with one friend at a time.” “He’s just quiet.” If you’re using these statements to describe your child, then he or she may be introverted. Parents, especially extroverted ones, often struggle to understand and figure out how to support their introverted child in an extroverted world. What can you do to be supportive of an introverted...

Read More

Website Designed by Imagine It Studios